1. 31 Jul, 2020 1 commit
  2. 30 Jul, 2020 1 commit
    • rdubner's avatar
      Modify cobcd.py This is Release Candidate 3.10 · 17e08128
      rdubner authored
      cobcd.py now accepts the cob_field f_ name in VARIABLE_STRING.  It can also tolerate ANY NUMERIC and ANY LENGTH
      variables, although it doesn't attempt to display them.
      
      This is the Rubicon.  After this release, I am going to switch over to using Simons cob_get... and cob_put... routines,
      which accept a pointer to the f_ cob_field variable and accept or produce text strings for the specified variable.
      17e08128
  3. 29 Jul, 2020 3 commits
  4. 28 Jul, 2020 2 commits
  5. 27 Jul, 2020 1 commit
    • rdubner's avatar
      This is the Release Candidate for Version 3.9 · c99f6bee
      rdubner authored
      It incorporates improvements to the logic of COBCD-ST, including more robust handling of
      REDEFINES and some 66/RENAMES capability.
      
      COBCD-ST is significantly faster because of the elimination of a couple of O(N-squared)
      constructions in the code.  For a program with 40,000 COBOL variables it is thirty times
      faster.
      
      COBCD-SFIX is faster by a factor of about six.
      
      The Python cobcd.py has been altered to pick up the cross-reference VARIABLE_STRING much
      faster than before.  A test program with 40,000 COBOL variables used to take 2.5 minutes to
      read over the string, one character at a time.  Use of a different GDB command for looking
      at string data got that down to 1.5 seconds.
      c99f6bee
  6. 23 Jul, 2020 1 commit
  7. 22 Jul, 2020 1 commit
  8. 20 Jul, 2020 1 commit
  9. 14 Jul, 2020 1 commit
  10. 13 Jul, 2020 4 commits
  11. 09 Jul, 2020 1 commit
  12. 08 Jul, 2020 1 commit
    • rdubner's avatar
      Advance to version 3.2 · b92848a1
      rdubner authored
      Changed the cobcd to handle no parameters cleanly.  It also generates reasonable responses
      to the parameters --version and --help.
      b92848a1
  13. 07 Jul, 2020 2 commits
  14. 15 Jun, 2020 1 commit
  15. 16 May, 2020 1 commit
  16. 15 May, 2020 1 commit
  17. 07 May, 2020 2 commits
  18. 30 Apr, 2020 1 commit
  19. 28 Apr, 2020 2 commits
  20. 24 Apr, 2020 1 commit
    • rdubner's avatar
      Release 2.3 Modify COBST to handle MINGW Windows compilations. · c28ed19f
      rdubner authored
      In Linux, C symbols appear in the symbol table as they appear in the source.
      In Windows, symbols are prepended with an underscore.  GDB knows this, and
      treats them as if they have no underscore.  COBST has to do some analysis of
      symbol names, and it had to be taught about those leading underscores.
      c28ed19f
  21. 19 Apr, 2020 1 commit
  22. 02 Apr, 2020 1 commit
  23. 26 Feb, 2020 1 commit
  24. 21 Feb, 2020 1 commit
  25. 04 Feb, 2020 1 commit
  26. 02 Feb, 2020 1 commit
  27. 22 Jan, 2020 1 commit
  28. 20 Jan, 2020 4 commits
    • rdubner's avatar
      2318b2dd
    • rdubner's avatar
      Release version 0.10.1 · 21ad4aac
      rdubner authored
      This version involves a moderately radical change.  Up until now, the process involved
      creating a .tab file that was left next to the .cbl source file.  The cprint.py script
      embedded in the executable would look for the .tab file and get line number and COBOL/C
      symbol table cross-reference information from there.  In this version, obmod reads
      the .tab file and embeds the data into the cprint.py script.  The symbols ride with
      the executable, and the .tab file isn't needed once obmod runs.
      21ad4aac
    • rdubner's avatar
      Debugging · a2596b28
      rdubner authored
      a2596b28
    • rdubner's avatar
      Release version 0.10.1 · f0ea1487
      rdubner authored
      This version involves a moderately radical change.  Up until now, the process involved
      creating a .tab file that was left next to the .cbl source file.  The cprint.py script
      embedded in the executable would look for the .tab file and get line number and COBOL/C
      symbol table cross-reference information from there.  In this version, obmod reads
      the .tab file and embeds the data into the cprint.py script.  The symbols ride with
      the executable, and the .tab file isn't needed once obmod runs.
      f0ea1487